Tagged: U.S. employment law

Managing Workplace Safety in the COVID-19 Era

The workplace safety framework in the United States is difficult to navigate at its best.  Since the beginning of the COVID-19 global health emergency, employers have faced increasingly complex challenges involving inconsistent and conflicting guidance regarding workplace safety regulations and best practices.  Since taking office in January 2021, the Biden administration has initiated the process...

The COVID-19 Vaccine – Next Steps for Canadian Employers with U.S. Operations

The United States is currently experiencing the largest surge in COVID-19 cases since the global health emergency began.  In the past several weeks, the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) granted emergency-use authorization to the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, prompting employers to ask whether they may require employees to be vaccinated. It is...

U.S. Department of Labor Rule Broadens the Classification of Independent Contractors

The United States Department of Labor (DOL) has issued a proposed rule addressing the definition of “independent contractor” in the context of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Canadian companies with a presence in the United States should monitor the proposed rule and its impacts on their American operations.  If adopted, the proposed rule would...

Independent Contractors Under U.S. Law: Knowing Your ABCs

A recent trend in U.S. employment law has been the adoption of stricter and stricter tests for when a worker may be classified as an independent contractor rather than an employee. Independent contractor relationships are often less expensive and easier for employers to administer since employers are not responsible for providing healthcare benefits to independent...

Employment Terms and Terminations: It’s Different in the States

Employers sometimes include fixed terms of employment in their employment agreement. Sometimes a fixed term is meant to prompt the parties to renegotiate at the end of the term. Sometimes a fixed term is meant to document the point in time where the parties have, in fact, agreed that the employment will end. Sometimes a...

A WARN Act Warning

Under U.S. law, large employers have an obligation to notify their employees at least 60 days before a “plant closing” or “mass layoff.” This requirement can have serious implications for Canadian companies engaged in M&A deals with U.S. companies. The U.S. Federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (“WARN Act”) requires employers with 100 or...

U.S. Employment in the #MeToo Era

The United States isn’t the only country addressing its history of gender inequality, sexual abuse, and sexual harassment. However, the United States is having its own unique experience in doing so. For U.S. employers, the current focus on these issues poses challenges, but also opportunities to address problems of diversity and harassment in the workplace....